Combining Dnsmasq and Unbound

For my home office network I have been using Dnsmasq for some time. Dnsmasq provides me with DNS, DHCP, DHCPv6, and IPv6 Router Advertisement. I run dnsmasq on a Debian Jessie server, but it works similar with OpenWRT if you want to use a smaller device. My entire /etc/dnsmasq.d/local configuration used to look like this:


Here dhcp-authoritative enable DHCP. interface=eth1 says to listen on eth1 only, which is my internal (IPv4 NAT) network. I try to keep track of the MAC address of all my devices in a /etc/ethers file, so I use read-ethers to have dnsmasq give stable IP addresses for them. The dhcp-range is used to enable DHCP and DHCPv6 on my internal network. The dhcp-option=option6:dns-server,[::] statement is needed to inform the DHCP clients of the DNS resolver’s IPv6 address, otherwise they would only get the IPv4 DNS server address. The enable-ra parameter enables IPv6 router advertisement on the internal network, thereby removing the need to run radvd too — useful since I prefer to use copyleft software.

Recently I had a desire to use DNSSEC, and enabled it in Dnsmasq using the following statements:


The dnssec keyword enable DNSSEC validation in dnsmasq, using the indicated trust-anchor (get the root-anchors from IANA). The dnssec-check-unsigned deserves some more discussion. The dnsmasq manpage describes it as follows:

As a default, dnsmasq does not check that unsigned DNS replies are legitimate: they are assumed to be valid and passed on (without the “authentic data” bit set, of course). This does not protect against an attacker forging unsigned replies for signed DNS zones, but it is fast. If this flag is set, dnsmasq will check the zones of unsigned replies, to ensure that unsigned replies are allowed in those zones. The cost of this is more upstream queries and slower performance.

For example, this means that dnsmasq’s DNSSEC functionality is not secure against active man-in-the-middle attacks between dnsmasq and the DNS server it is using. Even if used DNSSEC properly, an attacker could fake that it was unsigned to dnsmasq, and I would get potentially incorrect values in return. We all know that the Internet is not a secure place, and your threat model should include active attackers. I believe this mode should be the default in dnsmasq, and users should have to configure dnsmasq to not be in that mode if they really want to (with the obvious security warning).

Running with this enabled for a couple of days resulted in frustration about not being able to reach a couple of domains. The behaviour was that my clients would hang indefinitely or get a SERVFAIL, both resulting in lack of service. You can enable query logging in dnsmasq with log-queries and enabling this I noticed three distinct form of error patterns:

jow13gw dnsmasq 460 - -  forwarded to
jow13gw dnsmasq 460 - -  validation result is BOGUS
jow13gw dnsmasq 547 - -  reply is BOGUS DNSKEY
jow13gw dnsmasq 547 - -  validation result is BOGUS
jow13gw dnsmasq 547 - -  reply is BOGUS DS
jow13gw dnsmasq 547 - -  validation result is BOGUS

The first only happened intermittently, the second did not cause any noticeable problem, and the final one was reproducible. To be fair, I only found the last example after starting to search for problem reports (see post confirming bug).

At this point, I had a confirmed bug in dnsmasq that affect my use-case. I want to use official packages from Debian on this machine, so installing newer versions manually is not an option. So I started to look into alternatives for DNS resolving, and quickly found Unbound. Installing it was easy:

apt-get install unbound

I created a local configuration file in /etc/unbound/unbound.conf.d/local.conf as follows:

	interface: ::1
	interface: 2001:9b0:104:42::2
	access-control: allow
	access-control: ::1 allow
	access-control: allow
	access-control: 2001:9b0:104:42::2/64 allow
	outgoing-interface: 2001:9b0:1:1a04::2
#	log-queries: yes
#	verbosity: 2

The interface keyword determine which IP addresses to listen on, here I used the loopback interface and the local address of the physical network interface for my internal network. The access-control allows recursive DNS resolving from those networks. And outgoing-interface specify my external Internet-connected interface. log-queries and/or verbosity are useful for debugging.

To make things work, dnsmasq has to stop providing DNS services. This can be achieved with the port=0 keyword, however that will also disable informing DHCP clients about the DNS server to use. So this has to be added in manually. I ended up adding the two following lines to /etc/dnsmasq.d/local:


Restarting unbound and dnsmasq now leads to working (and secure) internal DNSSEC-aware name resolution over both IPv4 and IPv6. I can verify that resolution works, and that Unbound verify signatures and reject bad domains properly with dig as below, or use online DNSSEC resolver test page although I’m not sure how confident you can be in the result from that page.

$ host has address mail is handled by 1
$ host
;; connection timed out; no servers could be reached

I use Munin to monitor my services, and I was happy to find a nice Unbound Munin plugin. I installed the file in /usr/share/munin/plugins/ and created a Munin plugin configuration file /etc/munin/plugin-conf.d/unbound as follows:

user root
env.statefile /var/lib/munin-node/plugin-state/root/unbound.state
env.unbound_conf /etc/unbound/unbound.conf
env.unbound_control /usr/sbin/unbound-control
env.spoof_warn 1000
env.spoof_crit 100000

I run munin-node-configure --shell|sh to enable it. To work unbound has to be configured as well, so I create a /etc/unbound/unbound.conf.d/munin.conf as follows.

	extended-statistics: yes
	statistics-cumulative: no
	statistics-interval: 0
	control-enable: yes

The graphs may be viewed at my munin instance.

Small syslog server

My home network has several devices that do not have large persistent storage to keep log files. For example, my wireless routers based on OpenWRT doesn’t log to the limited local storage it has, and a Flukso energy metering device log power readings to a ramdisk. These devices log a fair amount of information that I ideally would like to keep for later analysis. I have never before seen a need to setup a syslogd server, thinking that storing logs locally and keeping regular backups of the machine is good enough. However, it appears like this situation calls for a syslogd server. I found an old NSLU2 in my drawer and installed Debian Squeeze on it following Martin Michlmayr’s instructions. I’m using a 4GB USB memory stick for storage, which should hold plenty of log data. I keep backups of the machine in case the USB memory stick wears out.

After customizing the installation to my preferences (disable ssh passwords, disable portmap/rpc.statd/exim4, installing etckeeper, emacs23-nox, etc) I am ready to configure Rsyslog. I found what looked like the perfect configuration example, “Storing messages from a remote system into a specific file”, but it requires me to hard code a bit too much information in the configuration file for my taste. Instead, I found the DynFile concept. With a file /etc/rsyslogd.d/logger.conf as below I can point any new device to my log server and it will automatically create a new file for it. And since the dates are embedded into the filename, I get log rotation suitable for rsync-style backups for free.

$ModLoad imudp
$UDPServerRun 514

$ModLoad imtcp
$InputTCPServerRun 514

$template DynFile,”/var/log/network-%HOSTNAME%-%$year%-%$month%-%$day%.log”
:fromhost-ip, !isequal, “” ?DynFile
:fromhost-ip, !isequal, “” ~

After this, I get log files written to /var/log/network-IP-YEAR-MONTH-DAY.log. For example:

pepparkaka:~# tail /var/log/network- 
Mar 20 13:40:21 avahi-daemon[1508]: Registering new address record for on br-lan.IPv4.
Mar 20 13:40:21 avahi-daemon[1508]: Registering HINFO record with values 'MIPS'/'LINUX'.
Mar 20 13:40:21 sysinit: setting up led WAN LED (green)
Mar 20 13:40:21 kernel: ar71xx-wdt: enabling watchdog timer

Use uci to configure the OpenWRT boxes to send log messages to this server:

uci set system.@system[0].log_ip=
uci commit

Update! By default rsylog performs reverse lookups of incoming requests. This easily causes problems in case your DNS server is unreachable. Rsyslogd appears to have a long timeout for DNS queries, so if you expect incoming log messages to end up in the log when they are sent, think again. In my testing, it can take minutes until they end up in the log. For me, reverse DNS lookups does not add anything of value. To disable DNS lookups, make sure rsyslogd is invoked with the ‘-x’ parameter. On Debian, this is done by adding ‘-x’ to /etc/defaults/rsyslog like this:


OpenWRT with Huawei E367 and TP-Link TL-WR1043ND

The ability to connect a 3G modem to a wireless router to form a Internet connected ad-hoc network of machines is very powerful. I’ve done this many times and have written about it before (e.g., see my OpenWRT writeup page) but I recently did it with modern hardware again. Here I will use the TP-Link TL-WR1043ND wireless router (available here for around $50) together with the Huawei E367 3G UMTS/HSDPA modem. Other wireless routers and modem should work fine. The software is OpenWRT 10.03 although I hope to redo this with LibreWRT eventually. My writeup is mostly focused around what is happening around the prompt, so it is mostly a cut’n’paste terminal session with a comment interlined.

TL-WR1043ND and Huawei 367

Router and modem

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OpenWRT 10.03 “Backfire”

Earlier I have written about OpenWRT configuration for two routers in a home network and OpenWRT configuration for 3G dial-up (which succeeded my summerhouse OpenWRT writeup) before. The OpenWRT project recently announced a new release, OpenWRT 10.03 Backfire. Thus, this appeared like a good opportunity to wipe out the old configurations on my routers and rewrite the articles using the latest software. I have two articles:

OpenWRT 8.09 plus Huawei E220

Now that OpenWRT 8.09 has been released, I finally took the time to write down my notes on how to use it together with the Huawei E220 dongle, which supports 3G/HSDPA.

Huawei E220

The writeup on how to do this is long, so I put it at a separate page:

Home Wireless Network

Using OpenWRT with WPA-PSK 2 on Broadcom WLAN routers have been stuck on a quite old bug. Recently someone suggested that it may have been fixed in trunk, which caused me to test it. And it works!

It took some time to work out the details here. To save myself time to reconstruct the commands, and hopefully save you some time too, I wrote down how to use OpenWRT with two Asus WL-500g Premium linked together wirelessly using WDS and PSK2 encryption.

The writeup is long, so I put it on a separate page:

If you are interested in using OpenWRT with a 3G connection, you may find my summer house internet writeup more useful.